2
$\begingroup$

In this question, I offered a bounty, but there are only two answers which really qualify as non-answers. I asked in a comment for the OP to post an answer so I could award him the bounty for asking a cool question, but he hasn't done so.

Would it be kosher for me to post a non-answer myself, award myself the bounty, and then put a bounty on another question? Would the software even permit that? Other suggestions?

| |
$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I do not think that you can award the bounty to yourself. $\endgroup$ – Tsuyoshi Ito Nov 16 '10 at 19:56
5
$\begingroup$

If all answers are really non-answers, I guess the best solution is to let the bounty expire (and let the software do whatever it does in these situations).

A bounty is always risky. You are not guaranteed to get a good answer even if you offer a bounty. And the system is really built so that you can't get your bounty back.

| |
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. FYI there is now a candidate answer for this question. $\endgroup$ – Aaron Sterling Nov 16 '10 at 21:49
  • $\begingroup$ ... which was just deleted by the answerer. Sigh. $\endgroup$ – Aaron Sterling Nov 16 '10 at 21:51
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ IIRC when the bounty expires the software gives half the bounty amount to the answer with the most up-votes. $\endgroup$ – Warren Schudy Nov 16 '10 at 23:48
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I think this happens only if the answer has some positive votes (probably +3, but I don't remember exactly how many). $\endgroup$ – Kaveh Nov 17 '10 at 6:02
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ From FAQ: If you do not award your bounty within 7 days, the highest voted answer created after the bounty started with at least 2 upvotes will be awarded half the bounty amount. $\endgroup$ – M.S. Dousti Nov 22 '10 at 22:39
2
$\begingroup$

I decided to award the full bounty to the most upvoted answer, since it was going to receive half the rep anyway. If someone posts a solution to that problem in the future, I'll start another bounty so I can award rep to the solver.

| |
$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .